Milk and Dairy Free Breakfast Ideas

Milk and Dairy Free Breakfast Ideas

4 minute read time

If you’ve just found out you have a milk or dairy intolerance, then adjusting to a world without your dairy filled breakfast favourites can seem difficult.

However, there’s more to the first meal of the day than just milky cereal and buttery toast, and cutting out dairy needn’t mean limiting the options available to you at breakfast time. In fact, with our milk and dairy free breakfast ideas, you might even find that the most important meal of the day becomes your favourite too. Take a look at our tops tips and recipes below.

Get cracking

Quick, nutritious, and filling; if there’s one ingredient that ticks all the right breakfast boxes, it’s eggs. As well as being one of the easiest breakfast foods out there, eggs are also incredibly good for us. One egg contains on average just 75 calories, and around 5g of good fats, which play a part in hormone production, blood pressure regulation, and many more essential bodily functions. They’re also high in protein and vitamins, making them the perfect choice for a pre morning workout meal.

Nutritional wonders aside, eggs bring another benefit to the breakfast table with their sheer versatility. Whether you like them scrambled, fried, boiled, poached, or even baked as in our recipe below, eggs can be served up with a minimum of fuss in no time at all. Don’t believe us? Try out our winning combination of baked eggs and avocado below.

Avocado Baked Eggs

Serves 2

Ingredients

2 ripe avocados
4 medium eggs
Salt and pepper, to taste
Chopped chives (or whatever fresh herbs you have to hand)

Method

1) Preheat the oven to 200c.
2) Slice each avocado in half, and carefully remove the stone. If needed, scoop out a little extra flesh from the middle of the avocado so the egg will fit in.
3) Place the avocado in a snug fitting dish.
4) Carefully crack one egg into each avocado half, then place in the oven for 15 minutes or until set.
5) Remove from the oven, season with salt and pepper, and garnish with the herbs.

Adapt the classics

Removing milk or dairy from your diet doesn’t necessarily mean removing the traditional breakfast standards we all know so well. After all, on days where we’re a little “slow to start”, there sometimes just isn’t enough time (or extra brainpower) to think of a quick breakfast that can’t be poured into a bowl and eaten in a hurry.

Luckily, our next dairy and milk free breakfast idea has all the quick and easy characteristics of a breakfast cereal, without the added sugar and empty calories. Even better, it can be prepared the night before, making it perfect for those of us out there who definitely aren’t morning people.

Paleo Porridge (Gluten/Dairy Free)

Porridge

Serves 1 (for more servings, just equally increase the quantities of each ingredient)

Ingredients

2 tbsp. desiccated coconut
1 tbsp. ground flax seed
1 tbsp. chai seeds
1 tbsp. pumpkin seeds
1 tbsp. sunflower seeds
1 tbsp. ground walnuts
2 tsps. cinnamon
2 tsps. raisins (optional – remove to make yeast free)
Orange zest, to taste
150 ml coconut milk, to taste (or your preferred milk substitute)
20ml water

Method

1) Combine all dry ingredients in a bowl.
2) Add the coconut milk and water, and stir until well combined.
3) Cover, and place in a fridge overnight.
4) When ready to serve, place in a pan on the hob until heated through, and garnish with fresh fruit, nuts, or seeds. This tastes great cold as paleo bircher muesli too!

Travel back in time

Just as you can create great dairy and milk free breakfast ideas by playing with modern day classics, you can find new favourites by taking inspiration from the past.

Many of the foods that we today associate with the first meal of the day are relatively recent introductions, and throughout history a wide variety of foods have graced the breakfast table. For example, whilst fish was once a morning staple, nowadays fish on the everyday breakfast menu is relatively rare. We think this is a shame, as fitting fish into a morning routine can be a great way to get your recommended two portions a week. Why not follow in the footsteps of the Victorians, by simply grilling kippers and serving alongside oatcakes for a dairy free Omega-3 rich start to the day.

Similarly, as wheat seems to form such a big part of the early morning menu in the form of bread, cereals, toast, pancakes, muffins, crumpets (we could continue all day) it’s difficult to imagine a time when other grains got a look in over the breakfast table. However, before we managed to cultivate and harvest wheat, other grains formed part of the staple diet, with buckwheat being a prime example. Buckwheat has been eaten as far back as 5300 BC in Europe, and although the name isn’t a relative of today’s grain; it’s actually a member of the rhubarb family. Naturally high in protein and fibre, buckwheat doesn’t just have the potential to be a great dairy and milk free breakfast ingredient, but a gluten free one too. Take a look at our free-from buckwheat pancakes below; perfect with a cup of dairy free tea.

Free-From Buckwheat Pancakes


Buckwheat pancakes

Makes 10 medium sized pancakes

Ingredients

128g buckwheat flour
1 tbsp flax seeds
¼ tsp bicarbonate of soda
½ tsp baking powder
3 dates, roughly chopped
230ml water
21g cashew nuts
½ tsp cinnamon
1 tsp coconut oil

Method

1) Place all ingredients (except coconut oil) in a blender, and pulse until smooth and creamy.
2) Heat coconut oil in a non-stick pan until melted.
3) Using a ladle, spoon the pancake batter into the hot pan into evenly sized circles – you may need to do this in batches.
4) Cook pancakes until air bubbles form, then flip over.
5) Leave until browned on the other side (around 20-30 seconds), then remove from pan.
6) Serve sprinkled with a little more cinnamon, and whatever accompaniments you like – we like to add seasonal fruits and berries.
So there you have it; with a few tips, tricks, and new ingredients, eating healthily at breakfast without milk and dairy couldn’t be simpler.

Are you concerned that something in your breakfast might not be agreeing with you? Take a look at our FirstStep Test, to see if a food intolerance might be the problem.

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