How does food intolerance affect your weight?

For many years, YorkTest have seen that people coming to us to help find relief from their symptoms of food intolerance have also found that they normalise their weight and shape as a side benefit of changing their diet in response to our food-specific IgG food intolerance test.

We know that there are other factors that contribute to weight loss apart from food intolerance; however, it is clear that food intolerance, together with food input and energy output, all contribute to energy balance in the body.

The regulation of food intake in the body is a very complex process, which involves biochemical signals from many sources including the brain-gastrointestinal tract, fat stores and the pancreas. Even the fat cells themselves are very highly specialised to play important roles in energy storage, fatty acid metabolism and glucose regulation.

The digestive system needs to process and deliver nutrients to the whole body. A stressed digestive system is less able to process energy and nutrients for the rest of the body. More than 70% of the body’s immune system is in the gut and once the immune response is triggered in the body (as evidenced by raised IgG levels) the body feels that it is ‘under siege’ thus hoarding supplies, storing fluid and increasing weight.

If the immune system is activated this leads to inflammation and swelling. 90% of the serotonin produced in the body is found in the gut; serotonin is a neurotransmitter responsible for regulating appetite, mood, sleep, and relaxation.

Low serotonin levels can cause a cycle of cravings which are satisfied by foods such as carbohydrates which destabilize insulin and blood sugar and ultimately cause additional weight gain; in other words, a vicious circle and it takes an overall approach to ‘undo’ the damage done. This overall approach needs to include identification and elimination of any food intolerances.

Break your cravings, remove those foods, take exercise, protect and heal your gut.

What comes first – obesity or inflammation?

Food-specific IgG antibodies are tightly associated with low grade systemic inflammation contributing to weight gain. With obesity such a hot topic at the moment, one of the big debates in medicine is which comes first obesity or inflammation?

A study looked at two groups of children, the first group were overweight and the second were in the normal weight range.  Blood was measured for IgG antibodies and C Reactive Protein (CRP) – this is a marker that shows the general level of inflammation in the body.

The results were startling. The obese group had two and a half times the IgG antibodies against certain foods than the children in the normal weight range. They also had three times the levels of CRP than the normal weight group.  This indicates inflammation in the body makes it harder to lose weight. What would be fascinating would be a further study with the overweight children cutting out their intolerant foods, reducing their IgG levels and consequently CRP and recording weight loss.

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What our clients have to say

Lesley Robinson

Lesley Robinson

Symptoms: joint pain, stomach pain, weight management Food Reactions: beef, Brazil nuts, guarana, grape
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Jo Wimble

Jo Wimble

Symptoms: sinusitis, weight gain Food Reactions: cow’s milk, grape varieties, yeast, wheat, cashew nuts
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Summer Quinn

Summer Quinn

Symptoms: bloating, weight gain, skin issues Food Reactions: gluten, eggs, cow's milk
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Matt Perry

Matt Perry

Symptoms: fatigue, insomnia, weight management issues Food Reactions: peanut, mustard seed, gluten, grape
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